The school is cancelled today because of the typhoon warning so I only work until lunch. After lunch, the weather clears up really nicely so I decided to have some Velvia Quality Time (VQT). Quite a windy day but it’s all worth it. (at 岐阜県大垣市赤坂町)

The school is cancelled today because of the typhoon warning so I only work until lunch. After lunch, the weather clears up really nicely so I decided to have some Velvia Quality Time (VQT). Quite a windy day but it’s all worth it. (at 岐阜県大垣市赤坂町)

Sometimes I miss some automation too. A view from my lens-less Canon EOS-1V, showing off its gorgeous 45 AF-points.

Sometimes I miss some automation too. A view from my lens-less Canon EOS-1V, showing off its gorgeous 45 AF-points.

My latest purchase: “Lost Lhasa” by Heinrich Harrer (out of print). I’ve had a passion for Tibet and Tibetan culture for a while. Heinrich Harrer is the author of “Seven Years of Tibet,” which subsequently was made into a movie, and I have read and watched both - I personally love this documentary. Heinrich Harrer along with Peter Aufschnaiter were the first foreigners who entered the holy city of Lhasa in 1946, and Harrer became the young Dalai Lama’s tutor then. I think overall the movie is very true to the book. Harrer was documenting his life in Tibet using a Leica IIIc that he shared ownership with his friend. The book consist of text and photographs that accompanies each other, as it’s more of a documentary photo book. #BuyBooksNotGear #Lhasa #Tibet

My latest purchase: “Lost Lhasa” by Heinrich Harrer (out of print). I’ve had a passion for Tibet and Tibetan culture for a while. Heinrich Harrer is the author of “Seven Years of Tibet,” which subsequently was made into a movie, and I have read and watched both - I personally love this documentary. Heinrich Harrer along with Peter Aufschnaiter were the first foreigners who entered the holy city of Lhasa in 1946, and Harrer became the young Dalai Lama’s tutor then. I think overall the movie is very true to the book. Harrer was documenting his life in Tibet using a Leica IIIc that he shared ownership with his friend. The book consist of text and photographs that accompanies each other, as it’s more of a documentary photo book. #BuyBooksNotGear #Lhasa #Tibet

Two days ago, I went to my favourite photo lab, Mizuno Camera, to print some of my photos. When the print came out, the owner lady of the shop started a small talk: “Your photos are quite interesting. Why don’t you enter a photo contest?” (She showed me the brochure above)

She continued, “This is an annual prestigious photo contest held by Fujifilm. Here, I’ll show you entries from last year.” She showed me the photos, and she goes on explaining what print size I should submit, and if I don’t understand how to fill out the brochure, just come back to the shop and she’ll help me with it. 

Now, some of you know that I’m not a big fan of photo contests - this is primarily because I don’t like the idea of using photography as a form of competition. This contest is due on October - that’ll give me some time to think about it, and more importantly, to see if I have any pictures worthy of submission. I may also use this contest as a platform to know more about the photography world in Japan.

Two days ago, I went to my favourite photo lab, Mizuno Camera, to print some of my photos. When the print came out, the owner lady of the shop started a small talk: “Your photos are quite interesting. Why don’t you enter a photo contest?” (She showed me the brochure above)

She continued, “This is an annual prestigious photo contest held by Fujifilm. Here, I’ll show you entries from last year.” She showed me the photos, and she goes on explaining what print size I should submit, and if I don’t understand how to fill out the brochure, just come back to the shop and she’ll help me with it.

Now, some of you know that I’m not a big fan of photo contests - this is primarily because I don’t like the idea of using photography as a form of competition. This contest is due on October - that’ll give me some time to think about it, and more importantly, to see if I have any pictures worthy of submission. I may also use this contest as a platform to know more about the photography world in Japan.

Étude  (at 養老公園)

Étude (at 養老公園)

I’ve just shot my last two rolls of Kodak Elite Chrome, ever. They’re discontinued, and I’m unlikely to get them ever again… I have to say these are possibly one of the most wonderful slides I’ve ever shot, they’re very versatile - great skin tones and great colour, saturation and contrast when the moment is right. Sad to say goodbye. But happy that the slides will be safely kept in my archives and I can always look back later.

I’ve just shot my last two rolls of Kodak Elite Chrome, ever. They’re discontinued, and I’m unlikely to get them ever again… I have to say these are possibly one of the most wonderful slides I’ve ever shot, they’re very versatile - great skin tones and great colour, saturation and contrast when the moment is right. Sad to say goodbye. But happy that the slides will be safely kept in my archives and I can always look back later.

Simplifying My Film Choices

When I started film photography a few years ago, I used to experiment with a lot of different films and trying to achieve different looks. I tried many expired films, too, but I’m never a big fan of cross-processing (due to unpredictable results). 

Nowadays, I don’t do it anymore and find it a pain to deal with, especially during the editing stages later on (no consistency). Right now I stick with two types of film: Fuji Velvia 100 for nature in bright sunlight, and Fuji Superia Premium 400 for all-around daily use. This is a picture of the film shelf in Mizuno Camera, my local camera shop. The choice of films aren’t that great, but it’s good to know that they will always have Velvia 100 and Superia Premium 400 - hence I chose them. 

image

I do not shoot b/w films anymore (for now) for two reasons: Firstly, I don’t have the developing tank and chemicals with me now. Secondly, my apartment is so tiny that I don’t know where to hang the film to dry even if I can process them. 

I do have a few rolls left of Provia 400F and some Neopan 400, and I intend to finish them off this summer. Maybe I will occasionally get a Portra 160, Ektar or other kinds of film, but I will not worry about them so much as before (I’ll save them for special occasions).

June Update

I’m aware that I haven’t updated the blog for a while. 

I have been travelling from February this year - I came to Japan with a tourist visa and looking for a job at the same time. I went to many different places but I mostly stayed at my friend’s place in Kochi prefecture. Thankfully I now have landed on a job as an English teacher (my initial goal), and have been settling into my new life in a new city now. I’m currently living in Ogaki city, Gifu prefecture. During these times, I’ve been having unstable internet connection (it’s better now). I have been off Twitter and Instagram for few weeks at a time. 

I love my experiences in Japan so far, I love my new job and new life too. I mean, I finally have a permanent address, yeah! :) 

What I am planning to do now is to make a new blog, to write about my experiences of living in Japan and also about teaching in general. I will keep Mountain Light as a blog dedicated to arts and photography (I still browse, like, comment other Tumblr blogs). I know there are many friends asked me about my life, and I might as well create a blog that everyone can see. This new blog will take a while to start because I have so little time outside work these days, and there’s just so much to write. It takes a lot of time to organise my thoughts, and write them down. Hopefully it will be a good one! 

As for my photography - in the past few months I have been shooting in colour slides (not many b/w and negatives), and I am immensely enjoying it. I just recently got back my shots from Osaka, Kyoto, and of course Kochi prefecture. I was able to capture the bright red torii gates of Fushimi Inari shrine, colourful kimonos, sakura trees, scenic mountains and rivers, all on colour slides, and I’m very happy with the results. Now is the time for curating and I will post some pictures soon. 

I’m also very happy that in my new city, I have several photo labs to go to that will process negatives, b/w and slides. I am adapting well to this city - I have been regularly visiting Mizuno Camera for processing and scanning the slides, and not long after I get to know the owner, Mizuno-san himself, and even letting me know photo exhibitions that are happening in the city. As of now, he has been running the store for 18 years! This is a small city, and I thought I will need to go to the next big city to do something special (such as processing colour slides), but turns out everything’s available here. 

That’s all the update for now, until then!

Tags: japan osaka kyoto

A photo of Bergen taken in 1971. I missed this place! 
natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

A photo of Bergen taken in 1971. I missed this place! 

natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

They may be off the clock, but they still have their cameras.

I have to agree with Sebastião Salgado on this one: “…For me, Indonesia is much more beautiful in black and white.”