Mountain Light

"I am a visual man. I watch, watch, watch. I understand things through my eyes." ~ Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004)

Photography/Travel Blog by Nick Susatyo
A photo of Bergen taken in 1971. I missed this place! 
natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

A photo of Bergen taken in 1971. I missed this place! 

natgeofound:

Embracing the fjord, a dusk-dimmed Bergen laps against mountain walls, Norway, 1971Photograph by George F. Mobley, National Geographic

A shot from my #Pinhole camera. About 1/2 sec through Kodak Tri-X. What do you think? This is one of the only shots from the roll that’s a keeper - it’s way too difficult to predict what’s in the frame (or I guess it’s just really not my style). Maybe #Lomo lovers will have fun trying pinhole cameras. Still, to think that this picture was made without a lens, that’s kind of amazing. And it was part of the early days of the history of photography.

A shot from my #Pinhole camera. About 1/2 sec through Kodak Tri-X. What do you think? This is one of the only shots from the roll that’s a keeper - it’s way too difficult to predict what’s in the frame (or I guess it’s just really not my style). Maybe #Lomo lovers will have fun trying pinhole cameras. Still, to think that this picture was made without a lens, that’s kind of amazing. And it was part of the early days of the history of photography.

camerasinthemedia:

Nikon F3/T with a telephoto lens featured in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. No, not the Nikon Df! :) It was used to capture snow leopards. 
There’s an interesting conversation in this scene:
Walter Mitty: When are you going to take it?
Sean O’Connell: Sometimes I don’t. If I like a moment, for me, personally, I don’t like to have the distraction of the camera. I just want to stay in it.
Walter Mitty: Stay in it?
Sean O’Connell: Yeah. Right there. Right here.

I recently watched an amazing movie called The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.
The main character, Walter Mitty is a photo editor ("negative assets") of Life magazine, and one of the photographers he’s working with was Sean O’Connell (I’m pretty sure they’re both fictional). The title and the synopsis won’t tell you this, but this movie is quite fascinating from a photographer’s perspective, and showing how a magazine photographer is always on the move (in this case, Sean doesn’t even have a permanent address). 
I submitted this picture to camerasinthemedia along with my favourite dialogue from the movie. 
Here’s a better screenshot of the movie:

camerasinthemedia:

Nikon F3/T with a telephoto lens featured in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. No, not the Nikon Df! :) It was used to capture snow leopards. 

There’s an interesting conversation in this scene:

Walter Mitty: When are you going to take it?

Sean O’Connell: Sometimes I don’t. If I like a moment, for me, personally, I don’t like to have the distraction of the camera. I just want to stay in it.

Walter Mitty: Stay in it?

Sean O’Connell: Yeah. Right there. Right here.

I recently watched an amazing movie called The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.

The main character, Walter Mitty is a photo editor ("negative assets") of Life magazine, and one of the photographers he’s working with was Sean O’Connell (I’m pretty sure they’re both fictional). The title and the synopsis won’t tell you this, but this movie is quite fascinating from a photographer’s perspective, and showing how a magazine photographer is always on the move (in this case, Sean doesn’t even have a permanent address). 

I submitted this picture to camerasinthemedia along with my favourite dialogue from the movie. 

Here’s a better screenshot of the movie:

orlandyy:

"Why photograph war? Is it possible to put an end to a form of human behavior, which is existent throughout history, by means of photography? The proportions of that notion seem ridiculously out of balance, yet that very idea has motivated me. For me, the strength in photography lies in its ability to evoke a sense of humanity. If war is an attempt to negate humanity, then photography can be perceived as the opposite of war, and if it’s used well, it can be a powerful ingredient and the antidote to war. In a way, if an individual assumes the risk of placing himself in the middle of a war in order to communicate to the rest of the world what is happening, he’s trying to negotiate for peace. Perhaps that’s the reason why those in charge of perpetuating a war do not like to have photographers around. In the field, what you experience is extremely immediate. What you see is not an image on a page in a magazine 10,000 miles away with an advertisement for Rollex watches on the next page. What you see is unmedicated pain, injustice, and misery. It’s occurred to me that if everyone could be there just once to see for themselves what white phosphorous does to the face of a child, or what unspeakable pain is caused by the impact of a silver bullet, or how a jagged piece of shrapnel can rip someone’s leg off. If everyone could be there to see for themselves the fear and the grief just one time, then they would understand that nothing is worth letting things get to the point where that happens to even one person, let alone thousands. But everyone cannot be there, and that is why photographers go there; to show them, to reach out, and grab them, and make them stop what they’re doing, and pay attention to what is going on. To create pictures powerful enough to overcome the deluding effects of the mass media and shake people out of their indifference. To protest, and by the strength of that protest, to make others protest."
- James Nachtwey

orlandyy:

"Why photograph war? Is it possible to put an end to a form of human behavior, which is existent throughout history, by means of photography? The proportions of that notion seem ridiculously out of balance, yet that very idea has motivated me. For me, the strength in photography lies in its ability to evoke a sense of humanity. If war is an attempt to negate humanity, then photography can be perceived as the opposite of war, and if it’s used well, it can be a powerful ingredient and the antidote to war. In a way, if an individual assumes the risk of placing himself in the middle of a war in order to communicate to the rest of the world what is happening, he’s trying to negotiate for peace. Perhaps that’s the reason why those in charge of perpetuating a war do not like to have photographers around. In the field, what you experience is extremely immediate. What you see is not an image on a page in a magazine 10,000 miles away with an advertisement for Rollex watches on the next page. What you see is unmedicated pain, injustice, and misery. It’s occurred to me that if everyone could be there just once to see for themselves what white phosphorous does to the face of a child, or what unspeakable pain is caused by the impact of a silver bullet, or how a jagged piece of shrapnel can rip someone’s leg off. If everyone could be there to see for themselves the fear and the grief just one time, then they would understand that nothing is worth letting things get to the point where that happens to even one person, let alone thousands. But everyone cannot be there, and that is why photographers go there; to show them, to reach out, and grab them, and make them stop what they’re doing, and pay attention to what is going on. To create pictures powerful enough to overcome the deluding effects of the mass media and shake people out of their indifference. To protest, and by the strength of that protest, to make others protest."

- James Nachtwey

Something That Can’t be Compared

A friend of mine recently expressed to me that she would like to start a business, but didn’t know what. Then she goes on,

"If you were in my position, that’s no big problem for you. You know what you’re good at and what you love. You can get an income from your photography easily. But not me, I don’t really know what I love."

Then I told her, “Wrong. Everybody think that I have a natural talent in art and photography, and that I love it so much everyday. It’s wrong because there’s a bumpy road along the way. There are even days when I think I should give up photography completely.”

image

Even James Nachtwey, my hero in documentary photography, sure to have struggled along the way in his career. He came to Sydney and I met him in May 2013.

And I was honest to my friend. Every artists will struggle with their craft, and I have seen a lot of photographer friends of mine who have diverted their creativity into music, painting, writing, or perhaps nothing related to arts. And this is something you have to know before even thinking about comparing yourself to other people. Usually, there’s nothing to be compared to (and it usually lead to unnecessary disappointment).

Have you ever had a crush on a girl (or a guy) and thinking she’s the perfect persona, although you don’t really know her all that well? I have. And I also found out that, no matter how ‘perfect’ her life may be, I actually don’t know the other aspects of her life — at the end of the day, she’s probably just another girl who’s worried about controlling her diet, or wondering whether to get a new purse or shoes in her next pay day… The usual worries as a perfectly normal human being. Ergo, we heard writers and poets who say, “…love the imperfect person perfectly.”

I guess before we were to say anything about others’ work, we have to know deeper than what’s at the surface. If a photographer exhibit ten photographs, it doesn’t mean s/he took only ten photographs (all of which are hanged on gallery wall). Who knows if s/he has taken 1,000 or 20,000 photographs before coming down to the best ten? You will only know if you know the artist deeper through interview or a direct Q&A.

Singapore, October 2012.

STREET PORTRAITIST: It's The little Things in Life

streetportrait:

image

Friday afternoon lunchtime. It is another cold day and it is starting to spit a bit (super light rain).
I decided once again to go somewhere not too far for lunch.
A mental map of all the nearby shops in the area formed in my head with shops I have been to this week turning up in red and…

Although one of my favourite portrait photographers Ade hasn’t been taking pictures lately… I happen to dive into his blog today and re-read this piece of entry. It’s such a sweet story that lightens the mood in my super-busy week :)

Nobuyoshi Araki on 'the dry brightness' of digital photography

valerian:

"Humidity and darkness are very important elements in photography, so you have to be careful with digital cameras because they sort of kill those elements, I say. I, too, use them, sort of recording things in everyday life for fun, though.

Photography needs to be sentimental. That dry…

The old man was right. 

(Source: rm409)

Lantau Island, Hong Kong. January 2013